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383 390 134,
724 058 536

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info@krajempodsumavou.cz,        info@chanceinnature.cz

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Content

T I P S    F O R    T R I P S : B Y    F O O T        

pěšky

Through the Javorník Region

From Prachatice to Libín

Visiting the Sights of Vlachovo Březí

From Šumavské Hoštice to St. Adalbert

To Hoštice for Strawberries, Hay and Sun

To Hus Castle

Yew Trees in Ktiš

From Bohumilice to the Mářský Hill

In the Footsteps of the Celts 

On Bike and Foot for the Gold in the Blanice Valley  Dvory

 

 


 Through the Javorník Region

Starting point: Vacov
Trail: Vacov-Vrbice-Milíkov-Javorník-Úbislav-Benešova Hora-Peckov-Vacov
Length: approx 15 km
Intensity: medium
Access: on foot; on bike for the fit
Refreshment: Vacov, Rohanov, Javorník, Benešova Hora
 

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Výškový profil

 

 

 

This hiking trip starts in Vacov, first mentioned in 1352. The villaMezník u Královského kamenege has three parts: Vacov, Volcanic and Miřetice. The dominant feature of the village is the Church of St. Nicholas built between 1888 and 1890 on the basis of a project by the Schwarzenberg architect, Jan Sedláček and the builder Jan Štěrbík of Vimperk. Several tombstones have been preserved in the church as well as a bell from 1588, made by Master Brikcí of Týnberk. There is an inscription on the bell from Václav Koc of Dobrš. Around the church in late summer and autumn you can find large mushrooms known as lurid boletes (Boletus luridus). There is a 17-century alcove chapel below the church dedicated to St. John of Nepomuk.
Vacov-kaple Sv. JánaFrom Vacov set off towards Sušice to Vrbice where you can see a chapel from 1949 and several timbered houses, there is one worth seeing behind the chapel on the left. Turn left and go through the cottage area where you connect to the blue trail. On the left, you will walk past a swimming pool where you can get some refreshments and have a swim. Continue on the blue trail through Milíkov to Javorník. There you will be welcomed by a statue of Karl Klostermann who had the local observation tower built, which is the highest place we will visit today.
Javorník is a popular tourist centre thanks to the merit of Rudolf Beran, a Member of Parliament and Chairman of the first Czech Agrarian Party, later thePohled z javornické rozhledny Prime Minister of the Czech Republic and the Protectorate. He also had the Švehla’s cottage built which is now used as a sanatorium. Thanks to Mr. Beran, the main road was paved and the village was electrified. Javorník offers several restaurants. There is also protected architecture, such as homestead no. 29 in the centre. From the homestead head towards the forest and the ski lift up to the top of Javorník (1065 above the sea level). Half the way up, stop at the protected rotunda of St. Half the way up, stop at the protected rotunda of St. Anthony of Padua built in 1939 and consecrated on 4 August 1940. The beautiful view from the rotunda will make you hurry up to the observation tower, from where the view is even Benešova Hora-lípamore captivating.
The observation tower at Javorník was built in 1938 but it was already planned in 1914 by a committee presided by Karl Klostermann. It could not be built because of WWI and later due to insufficient funding. The construction works began on 21 June 1938 and ended on 31 August of the same year. The tower was designed by Karel Houra and there are 27 stones with inscribed names of those who contributed to the construction. The extension was completed in 2003. Today, the tower has 197 steps, it is 39 meters high and the observation platform is at the height of 30 meters. When the weather is good, you can see the Šumava peaks, such as Velký Javor and Roklan,Královský kámen-kaplička as well as the Alps.
Leave the tower and go back to the village. Follow the yellow trail to Úbislava. At the bridge over Horský potok there is an old Bavarian rooster cross with the instruments of Christ’s martyrdom and craft tools. It was brought from Bavaria in the 19th century by a local farmer and carter, František Štoural, who had it repaired and erected. There is a 350-year-old beech tree behind the village. In 1971, it was 18 meters high and had a circumference of 397 cm at the height of 130 cm. The diameter of the crown is 20 meters. From Úbislava, walk along the road to Benešova Hora. The village is known for its south Bohemian folk Baroque buildings. Homestead no. 32 is more than 200 years old. There is a 360-year-old linden tree with a circumference of 575 cm. Walk along the road through Peckov back to Vacov.
 

 


 From Prachatice to Libín

Starting point: Prachatice
Trail: Prachatice-Libín-Libínské Sedlo-Prachatice
Length: 14 km
Intensity: high
Access: on foot
Refreshments: Prachatice, Libín
 

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Výškový profil

 

 

The historic centre of Prachatice ranks among the best preserved Renaissance centres in the Czech Republic. Several historic sites have been presePrachatice-Nová radnicerved inside the fortification walls including the well-known Helvít bastion and the town was declared a protected urban monument in 1981. The entrance to the historic centre is through the most romantic lower gate, called Písecká, which contains the remains of a cannon bombardment of Prachatice – half walled up cannon balls.
When walking past the gate, take note of Haydl’s house, No. 29, with its Renaissance sgraffito. Behind the house is the 14th century St Jacob’s Church which is the dominant feature of Prachatice, where 75 German citizens were burned in the sacristy during the Prachatice-bránaHussite uprising. The most beautiful sgraffito in Prachatice can be found in the lane behind the church at house no. 31: the Last Supper from 1563. 
At the square, there are more houses decorated with sgraffito: Rumpal’s house at No. 41, Sittre’s house at No. 13 (with a museum), Bozkovský’s house at No. 45. On the upper side of the square is the fascinating old town hall from 1570-71 with decorations by the painter Březnický. The new town hall dates back to 1903. There is a 16th century fountain with the statue of Justice in the middle of the square.
From the Prachatice centre, follow the red trail to the former town spa of St Marketa which was in operation from 1783 to 1935. The spa was used to treat nervous and locomotive diseases using the Priesnitz or Kneipp cold water methods. Several of the spa buildings are still standing.
Continue along the red trail and at the point where it sharply turns right, go straight along the reconstructed Stations of the Cross up to St. Philip Neri Chapel. The chapel dates back to 1803 when it replaced the original wooden onLibín-křížová cesta ke kapli Patriarchye. There used to be a procession from Prachatice to the chapel and the healing spring twice a year.
Continue down the hill, then up the hill until you join the yellow trail. Continue up to the crossroads at U Sedélka and turn right to the blue trail leading up to Libín Hill (1096m above sea level). There is a 27m high observation tower there, which was built in 1883 for the visit of Crown Prince Rudolf to Prachatice on 16 July 1871 and is therefore called the “Crown Prince Rudolf Tower”. It is open all year round except on Mondays and Prachatice and large parts of Šumava, Novohradské hory, and Blanský les with Kleť and Brdy can be viewed from the observation platform. When the weather is clear, usually in autumn, the Alps can be seen from there.
Libín-rozhlednaWhen you begin to tire of viewing the green Šumava woods, follow the blue trail to Libínské Sedlo. The settlement used to be called Fefry and was first cited in 1351. The Gold Trail used to run through there. There is a late Gothic church in the village dedicated to St. Anna, built in the 16th century and reconstructed in Baroque style in 1732 and there is also a house with semi-hip roofs.
From Libínské Sedlo, follow the yellow trail back to Prachatice. Along the route, take note of the remains of the Gold Trail which was used to import salt from Bavarian Passau to Prachatice.

  


 Visiting the Sights of Vlachovo BřezíVlachovo Březí-kostel Zvěstování Panny Marie

Starting point: Vlachovo Březí
Trail: the surroundings of Vlachovo Březí
Length:
approx 2.5 km
Intensity: medium
Access: on foot
Refreshment:
Vlachovo Březí
 

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Výškový profil


 

 

The village of Březí was probably founded at the beginning of the 13th century around a fortress. The owners of the fortress bore the title “of Březí”. The most famous bearer of this title was Oldřich Vlach of Březí, a member of the Malovec family, whose name the town bears today. Březí was promoted to a burgh in 1538 and it received a crest with a grey goat in a blue shield.
In the mid-18th century, the palace was reconstructed in the Baroque style. The Herbesteins bought the palace in 1858 and owned it until 194Vlachovo Březí-zámek5. In 1868, Franz Joseph I promoted Vlachovo Březí to a town. The palace is now owned by the municipality and it is not open to public. It has an L-shaped ground plan. The ground floor of the palace is older with barrel vaults and the first floor comes from the Baroque period and is decorated by stucco ceilings. Jan Neruda used to visit the palace, which is commemorated by a plaque on the facade of the palace.
The dominant feature of the square is the church of St. Mary of the Annunciation from the mid-17th century. This church was built by the former owner of the manor, Count Karel Leopold from Millesimo. There is an interesting statue in front of the church: Immaculata, i.e. the Immaculate Virgin Mary, from 1774. 
There used be an interesting custom in the old times that was observed until 1859: throwing a live goat from the tower on St Jacob’s Day. The butchers threw a festooned goat from the church tower and they finished the killing of the poor animal below the tower. The blood was sold as a potion for varioVlachovo Březí-křížová cestaus illnesses.
There is an inn from the 17th century opposite the church, building no. 189. Only a few steps away there is a plaque dedicated to the folk architect, Jakub Bursa, who also designed the former blacksmith shop which you can find under number 21 on the way from the square towards Volyň. It was built in the Bohemian folk Baroque style.
Go back to the Freedom square. From there, walk towards the cemetery where you can find a WWI memorial of the fallen. Above the cemetery and the road, follow the stations of the cross up to the hill where you will find the Holy Ghost Chapel, hidden among linden trees. The chapel was built by Duke Dietrichstein in 1702. The first paintings were done by a local artist, Boška. Go down along the stations of the cross paVlachovo Březí-pivovarst the former Schmied brewery to the 17th century Jewish cemetery. There are about 170 tombstones because the Jewish community used to be quite large here and they even had their own synagogue in Březí. There is a Norway maple called David’s at the cemetery, allegedly the most beautiful in the Czech Republic. Its trunk divides to seven main branches at the height of two meters, resembling a menorah. The tree is about 260 years old.
Go back to the square to view another former brewery, of Count Herberstein, which was in operation until 1924. The brewery building is quite large, with Baroque gables and a facade with red rectangular figures. There is a stork nest on the chimney.

In summer, you can go swimming to the natural pool in Libotyně.

 


 From Šumavské Hoštice to St. Adalbert

Starting point: Šumavské HošticeLštění-kostel sv.Vojtěcha
Trail:
Šumavské Hoštice- Vojslavice-Kosmo-Libotyně-Radhostice-Dvorce-Lštění-Šumavské Hoštice
Length:
approx 18 km
Intensity:
demanding because of its length
Access: on foot
Refreshment:
Šumavské Hoštice
 

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Výškový profil


 

This trip starts in the village dominated by St. Philip and Jacob’s church. You can see its Libotyně-kovárna č.p. 24red dome from far away. The village was first mentioned in 1360. It used to be a part of the Lčovice family, then later Vimperk manor. Today, it is a self-governing municipality. Building no. 25 is an old inn built by the folk builder Jakub Bursa in 1846. 
Set off for the local district of Škarez where you will turn left and get on the green trail. You will walk through the village of Vojslavice and Kosmo. Turn left at the Běleč hill and follow the path to the edge of the forest, from where you can see Lštění. Turn right and go down the yellow trail along Hajnice, the national natural monument declared in 1992, where you can see some protected orchidaceous plants, such as the Lesser Butterfly-orchid, Dactylorhiza longifolia, the European Common Twayblade or the critically endangered White Adder’s Mouth. Šumavské Hoštice-hospoda od J.Bursy
Go down to the valley of the Libotyňský brook and the village of Libotyně. It was declared a protected village zone in 1995 for the buildings that Jakub Bursa built: the chapel of Virgin Mary from 1844, blacksmith shop no. 24 from 1842 and homestead no. 6 called U Dudáků from 1845. These objects have been protected since 1958.
From Libotyně, you will go up the hill through Radhostice and Dvorce to Lštění. Radhostice is the administrative municipality for both Libotyně and Lštění. There is another building by Jakub Bursa: a pub from 1842.
St Adalbert’s church is the dominant feature of Lštění. The original church was built in the second half of the 13th century. However, there is a legend that says Adalbert of Prague visited the church in 995. The village is first mentioned in documents from 1352. 
The church was reconstructed in the Baroque style during the period of a strong Adalbert cult between 1739 and 1741. Stone-cutting work was done by Matěj Plánský of Český Krumlov. The main altar is decorated by statues of Czech patrons made in 1755 by Josef Muck, paintings by J. Putz, the pulpit was built in the first half of the 18th century and there is a GothiRadhostice-hospoda č.p. 23-7c baptistery from the 13th century. The original Gothic masonry of the presbytery has been preserved. The church has been a significant pilgrim's place for the locals. Old pilgrim standards which used to be carried at the head of processions are stored in the church. Next to the church, there is a graveyard with an ancient wall. There is a wooden cross from 1857 in front of the church. There is a votive chapel of the Assumption of Virgin Mary at the top of the rocky hummock above the church. The legend says that St. Adalbert blessed his homeland – BoheLibotyně-kaple od Bursymia from there.
Right across the street below the church, there is an old vicarage from the 15th century which still has a shingled roof. Below the vicarage, there is a spring called Good Water, above which an octagonal chapel was built. The chapel is also dedicated to St. Adalbert. According to the legend, the water is miraculous. The blind son of Countess Arnoštka of Eggenberk washed his eyes there and regained his sight and the Countess had the chapel built to express her gratitude.
There is a beautiful view from the church and you can also see the Šumava peaks from there, such as Boubín or Bobík. To the west of the village, there is a rock which the Boháč brothers, artists from Volyně, used to like. However, it is now covered by rich vegetation. Jan Neruda or Adolf Hejduk used to visit Lštění.
Take the descending crooked pathway and go back to Šumavské Hoštice.
 


 To Hoštice for Strawberries, Hay and Sun

Starting point: Volyně
Trail: Volyně-Přechovice-Hoštice-Milejovice-Dobrá Voda-Střítež-Neuslužice-
VolyněHoštice-zámek
Length: 16 km
Intensity:
medium
Access:
on foot, by bike
Refreshment:
Volyně, Hoštice

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Výškový profil

 



 Go from Volyně to the north and take the first right turn past the train station, up a slight hill, until you get the chapel of St. Anna. Built in 1836 it belongs to the village of Přechovice which was first mentioned in 1400. There is a 400-year-old linden tree next to the chapel. Continue to the village where you can have a look at the Bohemian folk BaroqHoštice-kravínue buildings, which include house no. 9 with a granary and gate and house no. 13 from 1824. From Přechovice, continue to Hoštice, the village that is well-known in the Czech Republic thanks to the director Zdeněk Troška who was born here. There are two options to arrive at the village: either go along the busy main road and then turn right across the railway crossing at the train station or you can follow a field path from Přechovice. In both cases you will get to the small South Bohemian village where the streets are named after the characters and the director: Keliška, Schutterstein Strasse, Svaté Cecilie, Troškův sad, Pod Hurvínkem etc. The square is called after another personality that made the village famous: the singer Michal Tučný. His grave is decorated by a larger stone hat made by Michal Gabriel, covered by pebbles with candles always burning. There is Dobrá Voda u Milejovicalso a fire brigade museum.
The village is first mentioned in 1274 when it was owned by Držislav of Hoštice. There is a single-storey palace with an early Baroque portal. The palace was built in the 17th century on the site of a fort. The design of the palace as we see it today comes from the times of the Chlumčanský family of Přestavlky: Václav Leopold, Prague Archbishop, is the best-known. The church of Virgin Mary was built with an unusual orientation north-south in 1593. It was reconstructed and furnished in the Baroque and pseudo-Renaissance style in the mid-18th century.
The village also used to be inhabited by Jews: there are remnants of a synagogue and a Jewish cemetery about 1 km north-west of the village with about 50 tombstones, out of which the oldest one comes from 1735.
From Hoštice, set off to the east past the former collective farm, these days known as Šimon Plánička’s ranch, named after the main character of the films mentioned above.
Another village you will go through is Milejovice. There also used be an estate or a fort until 1911 when it was parcelled out. Behind the village, there is a memorable two-armed cross that commemorates the soldiers fallen during the Napoleon wars. You will continue in the opposite direction around the St Adalbert’s chapel and when you exit the village, tPřechoviceurn right and follow the yellow trail to the pilgrim’s place called Good Water where Virgin Mary’s church was built in 1889-1891 above a pond with healing and miraculous water. There is a station of the cross by the church with fourteen chapels. There is a fair every eleventh Sunday after Easter.
Follow the yellow trail to Střítež. The village lies on the other side of the Stráž hill. There is also a chapel there, built in 1885. Today Střítež is mainly known for its large gardening and therapeutic community. In 1879, František Valchář, a significant Czech designer was born there. Follow the blue trail through Neuslužice back to Volyně.
 


 To Hus CastleHus

Starting point: Záblatí
Trail: Záblatí- Hlásná Lhota- Křišťanovice-hrad Hus- Blažejovice-Albrechtovice- Hlásná Lhota- Dobrá Voda- Záblatí
Length: approx 18 km
Intensity:
medium
Access: on foot
Refreshment: Záblatí, Kříšťanovice

Trase of the map

Výškový profil

 

 

Start the hiking trip to the ruins of Hus castle in Záblatí, from where you will follow the yellow trail to Hlásná Lhota. On the left, you will pass the stations of the crosses to Dobrá Voda. Walk through Hlásná Lhota to Křišťanovice. The Gold Trail used to pass through the village and the village was mentioned as early as in 1359. Nowadays, it is a recreational settlement spread above a seventeen-acre lake with a campsite where you can go fishing, surrounded by woods, if you have a necessary permit from the Municipal Council in Záblatí. Follow the blue train down a forest path, then a narrow footpath until you get to the gutter of the former castle moat and walk across tHus-údolí Blanice z hraduo get to the medieval Hus castle. The castle was established to protect the Gold Trail sometime after 1341 by the Pešek family of Janovice, the former lords of Vimperk. In 1359, the towns of Záblatí, Husinec and twenty other settlements belonged to the castle. During the Hussite wars, the castle was owned by Mikuláš of Hus till his death when ownership was taken by Jan Smilka of Křemže and then abandoned.
Habart Lopata of Hrádek took advantage of the abandoned castle to attack merchants on the Gold Trail with his company of brigands. The burghers of Prachatice incurred a lot of damage from these robberies and therefore they besieged the castle, which proved unsuccessful due its inaccessible position. However, when Habart’s supplies began to run low, he managed to arrange a free departure for himself and his men from the castle. After that, the castle was burned and destroyed, so only the ruins of its walls have been preserved. The ruins of the castle stand on a beautiful rocky promontory above Blanice. Be careful not step over the wandering root as the legend says that however crosses over it, will wander lost through the forest for three days. Allegedly, the White Lady appears there as she protects the treasures that Habart did not manage to take with him.
Walk down to the Blanice valley, cross the river over a footbridge, which gets repaired every year after floods, and then walk up again past pseudo-karst caves to the former village of Cudrovice. The whole village together with the Church of Virgin Mary Crowning was destroyed in 1950s. Only an old graveyard and ruins of a chapel have been preserved. There is a consecrated cross standing in the place of the church.Křišťanovický rybník
Take the left road back to the Blanice valley and go past the former Blanice mill (the whole area from there to Arnoštov is a protected landscape area) to Blažejovice. The village was resettled after displacement of the German inhabitants, but the population never reached its original state. There is an interesting preserved home with a hip gable there. At the other end of the village, by the bridge over the Blanice River, there are remnants of the Gold Trail.Carry on along the yellow trail all the way to Albrechtovice and then take the blue trail to the Křišťanovický Lake. Go down to Hlásná Lhota and take a right turn to Dobrá Voda. A chapel was built by the springs with healing waters in the mid-17th century. Later, in the 18th century, the builder Fortini built a spa there. The spa had problems from the very beginning until they were completely abolished after 1945. In the fifties, there used to be a school for Romany children and since 1974 it has been used for school trips. The chapel has been reconstructed and there are masses on Sunday preceding 16th July. Walk down the road back to Záblatí.
  


 Yew Trees in Ktiš

Starting point: Ktiš
Trail: Ktiš-Chroboly-Záhoří-KtišKtiš-křížová cesta-bývalá kaple
Length:
17 km
Intensity:
medium
Access: on foot
Refreshment: Ktiš, Chroboly

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Výškový profil



 

The Ktiš Region is an interesting area at the edge of the Boletice military domain. Its capital, Ktiš, has existed at least since the mid-14th century. In 1420, Oldřich of Rožemberk annexed it to the Krumlov estate. The dominant feature of the village is St. Bartholomew Church built in the early Gothic style, rebuilt and expanded in 1687-90 and Ktiš-tis červenýreconstructed in 1781. The church tower was raised in 1878. 
At the square, there is a WWI memorial to the fallen and a fountain. The square is surrounded by typical German, or Austrian architecture left behind by the former German inhabitants. The whole area was inhabited by Germans after the Thirty Years’ War. After 1945, almost all original inhabitants were displaced and Ktiš and the surrounding settlements were resettled. At present, the municipality is building a ski resort on the slopes of the Chlum Hill (1,191m above the sea level).
The European Yew grows in Ktiš and its surroundings. It is an endangered coniferous tree, which was very common in our lands in the Middle Ages. It only reaches the height of 10 meters but grows very old. The whole tree is very poisonous. The famous Welsh longbows were made from the yew tree. Yew was also used for the production of expensive furniture thanks to its red colour and interesting grain. One of these trees grows at the local cemetery. From Ktiš, follow the red trail to the Ktišská PChroboly-kaple P.Marie Lurdskéeak where there is a healing spring, too. The spring is called Ktišská and there is a chapel there dedicated to Virgin Mary from 1874 and the stations of the cross. However, the chapel is now used as a cottage, with a chimney in place of the belfry. Only the year in the gable and the covered pond reminds us of its original use.
Continue to the Ostrá Hill, cross over the Zlatý Brook and walk up to Chroboly.
The village has a similar history as Ktiš, it is mentioned as early as in 1317 as a forest of Strobole. The settlement was established by the monastery in Zlatá Koruna and later belonged to the Krumlov administration. There is an old church of the Assumption of Virgin Mary, originally Gothic but later expanded in the Baroque style by J. J. Fortini between 1754 and 1758. To the north of the village, there is a spring which used to be called miraculous or holy. In 1902-03, a single-nave chapel was built there in the neo-Gothic style. It was dedicated to Our Lady of Lourdes. The chapel made Chroboly a pilgrim’s destination. Behind the village, there is a nature preserve called Chrobolské tisy with the highest occurrence of the European Yew in the Czech Republic.
Ktiš-kostel sv.BartolomějeFollow the main road back to the valley of the Zlatý Brook and walk through the village of Záhoří with the original storey houses with hip roofs and a chapel from the second half of the 19th century. Behind the village, at the turn to Příslop, turn right and follow the forest path along the Mackový Hill back to Ktiš.
There are some new cycling paths in the military domain of Boletice. The paths go through beautiful nature past places that have been inaccessible for a long time and have some interesting monuments, such as St. Nicholas’s Church in Boletice or St. Martin’s Church in Polná. However, the marked trails through the military domain may only be used on Saturday, Sunday or public holidays between 7 am and 9 pm. 

 


 From Bohumilice to the Mářský Hill

Starting point: Bohumilice
Trail:
Bohumilice-Smrčná-Štítkov-Mářský vrch-Bošice-BohumBohumilice-zámekilice
Length: 10 km
Intensity:
medium
Access: on foot
Refreshment:
Bohumilice, Bošice

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Výškový profil



 

Ramparts of ancient fortified settlements have been discovered around the village of Bohumilice, on Křížovice Hill and Staňkova Hill. The village itself is very old and was likely established in the 10th century when it was owned by the St. Vitus Church in Prague but is mentioned in text 1353. 
At the end of the 15th century, Bohumilice belonged to the Malovec family of Chýnov. Jan Malovec built the Skalice fortress in 1579. After the Thirty Years’ War, the fortress Pohled z Mář.vrchu k javorníku-panoramawas reconstructed to a Renaissance palace which changed ownership to the Sickingens, Thun-Hohensteins and then the Lumbe family of Malonice. In 1923, the palace was purchased by a Prague factory owner named Ferdinand Holoubek.
During the Communist era in the 1950's, the National Farms of Vimperk managed the palace and in 1996 the damaged property was handed back over to the Holoubek family. The family has been trying to return the palace back to its original form. At present, the palace offers various services, including a horse riding school. There are en-suite apartments with separate entrances and a conference hall fMářský vrch-kamenné mořeor 50 participants. The riding school houses an exposition of the original breeds of domestic animals.
At the Chapel of St John of Nepomuk there is a 300-year-old linden tree. In the centre of the village, there is a church which was built circa 1200, originally dedicated to St Martin then later to the Holy Trinity and St Barbara. The original Gothic portal and the stone baptistery have been preserved. The church suffered from a fire in 1657 and 1815 so its current appeSv.Maří-rozhledna a vysílačarance comes from 1817-18. The fire in 1815 was so great that the church bellsmelted. Nowadays, the church is repaired. In front of the church are old tombstones of the Malovec family members which show their coat of arms that depict half of a horse.
The village is also known for a meteorite that was dug out in 1829. The weight of all the fragments found was almost 60 kilograms. The fragments are now at natural science museums all over the world: for instance in Vienna, Berlin or Chicago. The largest fragment, weighing 37 kilograms, is now stored at the National Museum in Prague.
The writer Karel Klostermann used to come to Bohumilice, where he wrote one of his novels. Other renowned natives of the village are the members of the Liška family: one of them was the manager of the Museum of Prague and another one the Bishop of České Budějovice.
Follow the blue trail up to Smrčná where you can find the ruins of an original courtyard mentioned as early as in 1381. The former three-storey granary is considered to be an original monastery of the Templers. There is a coat of Svatá Maří-rohledna2arms of five balls for the Sickingen family, the former owners of the Bohumilice estate. Smrčná is mentioned in a legend about a lord who did not value bread and so each bite turned to stone and he died of hunger.
Turn left in Štítkov and follow the blue trail to the Mářský Hill. Originally, a bare rock In 1935, the archivist and Pastor Fr. Teplý initiated the construction of an observation tower and a chapel on Mářský Hill. The tower is 12 meters high; the observation platform is at the height of 8 meters. However, the view is limited to the northwest due to vegetation growth. The road to St Vaclav Chapel is decorated by the stations of the cross. The whole complex was repaired in 2006. Go down the red trail from the Mářský Hill to the crossroads at Pod Hůrkou, from where you will go to Bošice and then along the old protected linden alley back to Bohumilice. 
 


 In the Footsteps of the Celts

Starting point: Kubova Huť
Trail:
Kubova Huť-Včelná-Buk- Svatá Maří-Budilov-Věnec-Lčovice-Kubova HuťPod Věcem-Královácký mezník
Length: 27 km
Intensity: difficult
Access: on foot
Refreshment: Kubova Huť, Buk, Svatá Maří, Lčovice

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Výškový profil


 

Celts were no doubt the oldest inhabitants of Šumava. They got there during the 6th century and brought along its first name: “Gabréte Hylé”, which meant “the Forest of Capricorns”. They founded one of the most extensive Celtic settlements there as well as the settlement with the highest elevation in the Czech Republic, Obří hrad by Nicov or Sedlo by Albrechtice.
The association of municipalities of Věnec in cooperation with the Bobík z Boubínavillage of Kubova Huť opened the “Educational Celtic Trail” in summer 2008. The trail is 27 kilometres long and it has six stops (Kubova Huť, Boubín, Buk, Mářský vrch and two in Lčovice) and it will direct you from Kubova Huť through Boubín and the Mářský Hill to Věnec by yellow and brown arrows.
Start in Kubova Huť, which is mainly known as the highest railway station in the Czech Republic (995 m above the sea level). The saddle between Boubín and Obrovec were used by the Celts and later by salt traders and as a branch of the Gold Trail. There used to be a glass factory there in 1729. Nowadays, the local inhabitants mainly live on tourism as Kubova Huť is a popular winter resort and the trail head for the hike to Boubín peak in summer, where you will go too, the highest point of the whole trip. At the top (1362 m above the sea level), there is a wooden observation tower which was built in 2005 and provides a view of Šumava from where you can see the Alps when the weather is good. There is a memorial stoBoubín-jezírkone with an inscription “Kardinal Fürst von Schwarzenberg, 3. 8. 1867”, erected to commemorate the visit of the Prague Archbishop.
On the slopes of Boubín, there is a natural preserve established by Verderor John in 1858 known as the Boubín rainforest encompassing an area of 666 ha which is fenced and inaccessible these days. Continue down to Včelná. There is a private museum of irons at House No. 5, at the Nuseks, the largest one in Europe.
Cross the Cikánský Brook to Buk which was first mentioned in 1400 where there is a chapel dedicated to Seven Sorrows of the Virgin Mary from 1800 and a protected homestead at no. 5. 
AnotVčelnáher stop on the trail is Svatá Maří. The original Gothic church of St. Mary Magdalene was reconstructed in the Baroque style in the 18th century, but some Gothic items including the baptistery with the crests of the Bukovský, Nebřehovský and Přecha families or a font have been preserved. The bells are one of the oldest ones in the region. Near the vicarage, there are protected linden trees, 200 and 350 years old.
Follow the red trail through the Mářský Hill and Budilov to a Celtic sight: the settlement at Věnec. Before Věnec, just after Budilov, there is a boulder called Královácký. At the rocky hill top of Věnec, sometimes called Pržmo (765 m above the sea level), there is a cultural monument (protected zone): a settlement from the Hallstatt and Latenian period. The artificially built embankments follow the natural rocky fVěnec-valyortification. The most extensive survey of the settlement was done by Professor Bedřich Dubský in 1920s. He found fragments of containers or a bronze sling with five rings from the Hallstatt and Latenian culture (6th to 5th century BC). He also found a wedge and a flint knife which indicate that the settlement was inhabited as early as the Stone Age.
Leave the settlement and go down to Lčovice. Finish the round trip by taking a train at the local station back to Kubova Huť.

 


 On Bike and Foot for the Gold in the Blanice Valley

Starting point: Záblatí
Trail: Záblatí – Zábrdské mlýn – Kratušín – Řepešín - Záblatí
Length: 10 km
Intensity: easy
Access: on foot
Refreshment: Záblatí, Kratušín
 

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You can go for a short hike from Záblatí on the yellow trail around the natural monument Zábrdská skála. The gneiss rock provides a nice view of the Blanice Valley. You can see placer deposits below the rock. The rock is protected together with the growth of the flower Golden Alyssum (Aurinia saxatilis). Continue through the slope above Blanice to the Zábrdský Mill and then turn left to Kratušín. Cross the Cikánský Brook at the Bartls where you will see some more placer deposits and then walk up to Řepešín. After Řepešín follow the blue trail along the Blanice River back to Záblatí. (The length of the trail is 10 km)
 

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